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#WorldVitaminDDay – Every year on 2 November, the World Vitamin D Day is observed to remind us about the importance of Vitamin D.

Observed, not “celebrated”, because 90% of us has no reason to celebrate our levels of vitamin D. We do, however, have a lot of reasons to observe our Vitamin D, not one day a year but 364 (you can have one day off).

Increased urbanisation and indoor lifestyles have brought back old diseases and fail to prevent or heal new the way nature intended it, by exposing your skin to UVB-light.

Enlightened people know how to avoid the relentless anti-sunbed campaigns and gather their own information about how to use the oldest and most efficient healing and prophylactic source to improve their health, mood and life, Are you one of those who see through the sun-scare and have learned how to embrace the sun?

Not only on #WorldVitaminDDay on November 2nd but all year round.

In the video below, I describe how I spend #WorldVitaminDDay

Go to www.worldvitamindday.net (from where I got the featured image to this post) for more information about World Vitamin D Day and about Vitamin D in general.

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4 thoughts on “World Vitamin D Day – 2 November 2019”

  1. Hi Göran,

    Thank you for sharing a lot of knowledge on this blog.

    I have recently moved from The Netherlands to Queensland (tropics) in Australia. Sun damaged skin is rampant here and the UV level is about 15 or 16 (extreme)at the moment. How can I safely go into the sun to get a bit of a tan & vitamin D without damaging and ageing my skin? I have Fitzpatrick type 2 skin. How do I know how long I can safely spend a little time in the sun without burning?
    The good thing about living here is that it’s easy to get your vitamin D through the tear, but overexposure is also a real threat!

    Thanks in advance for your advice.

  2. Hi Göran,

    Thanks for your reply! I’ve already read that advice. I was just wondering if it’s still safe to go in the sun at noon here in the tropics, because the UV level is extreme around that time. Is noon still a good idea? I’ve got the dminder app for making sure I don’t burn.

    Some questions that I have: because UVA is always there, should I always wear SPF15 on my face/hands/décolletage? And is that really enough?
    Is a tan a sign of skin damage?
    Can I age beautifully without risking ageing my skin despite tanning?
    It’s really hard to find a good tanning lotion in this part of the world. What do you think of Melanoboost?

  3. Hi Perla, you are already more prepared to enjoy the benefits of sunshine than most other people! And it’s my pleasure to try to answer your questions.

    it’s still safe to go in the sun at noon here in the tropics, because the UV level is extreme around that time. Is noon still a good idea? I’ve got the dminder app for making sure I don’t burn.

    The higher the sun stands, the shorter time needed to get your dose of vitamin D and the shorter time to expose yourself to the ageing UVA. Trust the advice of dminder. It’s a good app. So, yes, it’s still a good idea.

    because UVA is always there, should I always wear SPF15 on my face/hands/décolletage? And is that really enough?

    I would say that you need SPF only if you are in direct sunlight. The scattered UVA you get indirectly is nothing to worry about. And, for factor, remember what it stands for.

    Is a tan a sign of skin damage?

    A tan is a natural reaction in the skin from exposure to UV-light and just as much (or, probably, even less) a sign of skin-damage as pale skin from sun-deprivation.

    Can I age beautifully without risking ageing my skin despite tanning?

    Ah, here we have to be careful. It depends on what you mean with “tanning” and what you want to achieve. The “tan” I promote, is the natural result of short bursts of sun exposure to get your daily (or weekly) dose of vitamin D and other health benefits from sunlight. And this kind of “tanning” is rejuvenating for the skin, reducing signs of ageing. If you, however, tan with the goal of getting as dark skin as possible, I would say that, for sure, it will lead to premature ageing of your skin. So, my advice is to avoid doing that, especially with the original skin-type 2.

    It’s really hard to find a good tanning lotion in this part of the world. What do you think of Melanoboost?

    I don’t have the detailed composition of the Melanboost lotions and have never used any. Judging from the information online, they focus on ingredients for a faster tan with something they call “Peptide-complex”, which, probably, just is a combination of different kind of Tyrosines. This is, principally, a good idea if you tan for beauty (for darker skin). It is, however, somewhat counter-productive if you tan for health since with more melanin, the more natural protection and the longer exposure needed to get the health benefits from sunlight. My advice is to use mainly natural moisturizers based on Aloe-Vera and/or Coconut-milk/oil with added anti-oxidants from fruit- and nut- extracts. Admittingly, my absolute favourite, which I use every day, Limited Couture from Devoted Creations, does contain 0.82% Tyrosines, which is just enough for a minor melanin boost.

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