Do tanners make stronger children?

tanned-sperms-fasterIt is proved that sunshine make children stronger and now a new research also show that tanners make stronger children.

The Sunlight Research Forum (SRF) reports in their latest press-release from a new research of the importance of Vitamin D for human reproduction. The new study is done by a group of scientists from the University of Copenhagen Denmark.

The conclusion of the study is that men with high levels of the “Sunshine hormone” Vitamin D, produce stronger and faster sperms than men with low levels of Vitamin D.

Earlier, University of Arizona studies found that women are biologically programmed to seek out men with tanned skin because they’re perceived as older, richer and more “dangerous”.  Chemically speaking, the melanin responsible for tanning also boosts both your sex drives.

Apparently the two studies complement each other perfectly.

Here is the press-release:

Sperm switch into top gear with the sun

A study has proved that an adequate supply of vitamin D gives sperm an advantage in terms of motility, speed and penetration force

Veldhoven, 19 May 2011 (SRF) Men who top up on vitamin D in the sun or in a solarium, give their sperm an advantage in terms of motility, speed and penetration force. This was the conclusion of a study conducted by scientists from the University of Copenhagen investigating the role of vitamin D in human sperm production.

The scientists tested the quality of sperm from 300 men chosen at random and a detailed analysis of sperm from a further 40 participants was performed in the laboratory. At the same time the level of vitamin D in their blood was measured.

Almost half of the men had an insufficient level of vitamin D, below 50 nmol/l. The optimum level of vitamin D recommended by most experts is a minimum of 75 nmol/l. The sperm in men with higher vitamin D levels demonstrated significantly better performance in terms of motility and speed. In addition, the number of healthy sperm in men with insufficient vitamin D was considerably lower than in participants with normal levels. The ability to absorb calcium was also inhibited as well as the acrosome reaction which occurs during penetration of the female egg. Tests conducted in the laboratory resulted in similar findings.

The Sunlight Research Forum (SRF) is a non-profit organisation based in the Netherlands. Its aim is to make the latest medical and scientific evidence on the effects of moderate exposure to UV radiation available to the general public.

Study:

Martin Blomberg Jensen et al. (University Department of Growth and Reproduction, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark): “Vitamin D is positively associated with sperm motility and increases intracellular calcium in human spermatozoa”; in: Human Reproduction, 22 March 2011

Media contact:

Ad Brand

Sunlight Research Forum (SRF)

Tel.: +31 (0)651 358 180

info@sunlightresearchforum.eu

www.sunlightresearchforum.eu

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4 Responses to Do tanners make stronger children?

  1. fake tan May 27, 2011 at 02:01 #

    Hi Göran,
    Your article is interesting and I partially agree about the benefits of sunshine. Yes it is true that sunlight can be good for humans due to the vitamin D but as you know the problem lies in the UV radiation which has progressively become a problem in modern society. In Australia for instance, the biggest health issue is skin cancer. Hence natural suntanning here is not a healthy viable option which is why people are now turning to alternatives such as fake tans and other similar things.
    Another factor about a person’s predisposition to skin problems caused by the sun is their skin type – the less levels of melanin than have in their skin the less it is recommended that they be exposed to the sunshine.
    Thanks for your article.

  2. Debbie June 5, 2011 at 03:54 #

    I think the sun is awesome personally, but as far as anything being really good or bad for you: It’s all about moderation.

    Cooking your skin is no good, but UV rays improve people’s attitude and help us process vitamin D, so they’re not only important but a form of therapy.

    I say tan in moderation, in a tanning bed or outside, but make sure to follow the advice of the staff at tanning salons (rather that just setting the bed on “broil” and taking a nap!

    http://www.platinumtanusa.com

  3. Jonathan Swaringen August 14, 2012 at 05:36 #

    From my reading I’ve found that a diet with a good Omega 3/6 ratio of 1/1-1/4 is optimal. Many in Australia as well as everywhere are eating diets high in processed foods and have 1/20 ratios or worse.

    This is because of the prevalence of Omega 6 Vegetable oils and people aren’t getting enough Omega 3 of which Seafood and pasture raised meats are good sources of. This is because of the conventional wisdom or lack of wisdom really that says fat and cholesterol are what causes heart disease and so people are eating less healthy fat and more unhealthy fat.

    I just got through reading The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living and the followup to it The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance and many excepted paradigms are completely opposite to what is true.

    Another example involves the drugs they are telling people they should take like Statins for cholesterol lowering.

    Watch this video for a funny yet not so funny view on statins.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GqdzJLOQM2I

  4. Rick July 25, 2013 at 19:29 #

    This is a very interesting article. I like the statistics about the findings of women going for a tanned male over the rest. This is very intriguing to me. We all know that the sun offers vitamin D properties but we need to protect ourselves from the harmful UV rays too. I am a tanner myself and I enjoy doing it. Thanks for the info :)

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